Camel Cigarette It is Impossible to Tear Yourself Away from It
Camel Filters is a type of Camel brand of cigarettes that was introduced by JT International in 1913. Most current Camel Filters cigarettes contain a blend of Turkish and Virginia tobacco.
One of the constituent parts of Camel Filters cigarettes success is a combination of a high quality tobacco and the products low price. They belong to 10 best-selling cigarette brands.
Balanced nicotine content and a smooth taste make Camel Filters cigarettes a classic that will never run away.
Turkish and Domestic Tobaccos when expertly blended produce a smoke more pleasing than either kind smoked straight. Thats what youll find in Camel Filters cigarettes.
The Turkish tobacco that is used in Camel Filters cigarettes has a much more distinctive odor when burned as compared to other cigarettes. It generally has a darker, browner smell to the smoke.

Box Type: King Size

Tar: 12mg

Nicotine: 1.0 mg

Packs: 10

Made in: Europe

Length: 85 mm

16.08 USD Per carton
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You cant buy a more delightful cigarette than Camel Filters at any price. Theres no tongue-sting, nor unpleasant after-taste.
Nowadays, Camel Cigarettes represent three different families of flavor – Filters, Blue and Silver Blends. The Filter styles, which represent the bulk of the brands business, offer rich tobacco taste. Camel cigarettes Blue family offers smooth and mellow versions of the brands distinctive flavor. Camel Silver Blends, a line of premium-priced, limited-edition luxury blends, offer adult smokers indulgent taste signatures.
Camel Cigarettes is today one of the top five global cigarette brands, sold in over 90 countries worldwide. Camel Filters cigarettes have enjoyed nearly a century of outstanding success, and what was true of the original Camel is just as true today  its a Pleasure to Burn.

The Original Camel cigarettes which became one of the most popular cigarette brands since they were introduced by J. R. Reynolds tobacco company at 1913. The high nicotine content but smooth taste makes Camel cigarettes a classic that will never go away. Our shop offers you the Camel filter cigarettes, Camel lights/blue cigarettes, Camel no-filter cigarettes, Camel Filter 100 Box, and Camel Super Lights or Camel Silver.

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Camel reproduction posters, a table-lighter and ashtray, and life-size floor displays of the sailor and pin-up, were for sale as a mail-in offer. Camel is a popular sigarets brand which was introduced by R.J. Reynolds Tobacco (RJR) in 1913. Camel cigarettes contain a blend of Turkish and American tobacco. Camel cigarettes were blended in a way that made them easier to smoke, in comparison to other much harsher popular cigaretts brands at the time of its debut on the tobacco market. They were also promoted by a careful teaser advertising, which merely stated that the Camels are coming. At the beginning, the most famous variety of Camel cigarettes was the simple pack of the regular, unfiltered variety, which is much too harsh for today’s smokers. Camel regular cigarettes became very popular thanks to famous actor Humphrey Bogart who popularized Camel brand in the “Casablanca” film. It also became well-know through news broadcaster Edward Murrow, who smoked up to four packs of Camel regulars per day, actually using a Camel cigarette as his trademark. The reverse side of most packs or boxes of Camel cigarets display the following text: “Turkish tobacco is the world’s smoothest, most aromatic leaf.

Camel cigarettes, leader in se appeal ADS cigarettes
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Reynolds American Inc., the second- largest U.S. tobacco company, plans to raise prices on all of its cigarette brands after it increased its share of U.S. smokers in the first quarter.

Reynolds’ R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. division notified wholesalers yesterday it will charge 8 cents a pack more for top-selling          Camel cigarettes, Pall Mall and several other brands, David Howard, a company spokesman, said today. Distributors’ list prices for Carlton, Lucky Strike and other brands will climb by 33 cents a pack, he said.

The increases take effect May 12, two days after an 8-cent- a-pack increase by Altria Group Inc.’s Philip Morris USA, the largest U.S. producer. Reynolds boosted its share of U.S. smokers by 0.2 percentage point to 27.9 percent last quarter, helped by Pall Mall sales.

Reynolds, based in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, won’t explain why it’s raising cigarette prices, or disclose their average retail prices, Howard said. The increases cover more than 20 brands and varieties, he said.

Reynolds advanced 64 cents to $52.17 at 4:15 p.m. in New York Stock Exchange composite trading. The shares have declined 1.5 percent this year.

LAS VEGAS – Limited edition boxes of Camel cigarettes will soon arrive in stores across the country. The boxes feature nine popular Camel cigarettes ads-destinations and the famous Route 66. It is part of Camel’s “Break Free Adventure” marketing campaign. Las Vegas made the cut.

The campaign is sparking controversy.

“The fact that they’re designing a cigarette pack around our wonderful city just really shows what lengths the tobacco industry will go to to market their product and hook more people,” said Southern Nevada Health District Tobacco Control Coordinator Maria Azzarelli.

Others disagree with the health district and welcome the publicity. “I want that pack,” one Las Vegas resident said. “Cigarette smoking is bad. I smoke. It’s bad, but if it’s going to help the different cities’ economy, why not?”

The special-edition pack that features Las Vegas reads, “Vegas baby, the keeper of oh so many good times. Camel honors the oasis in the desert–built entirely for people of all walks to break free.”

Critics say R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company markets Camel cigarettes as cool, fun, and rebellious in an effort to appeal to kids.

“What they’re trying to do is associate Camel cigarettes with some of the most trendy and popular U.S. cities, places like Las Vegas, Seattle, Austin, San Francisco,” said Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids Vice President of Communications Vince Willmore. “We think it is really appalling that R.J. Reynolds is using the good name and images of these cities to market a deadly and addictive product.”

“We certainly agree that youth should not use tobacco products, and that’s a guiding principle and belief at R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company,” said R.J. Reynolds Spokesman David Howard. “We market our products only to adults who are aware of the risks of tobacco use and have made the informed decision to use tobacco.”

Officials in San Francisco and New York have already called on R.J. Reynolds to pull the campaign. The packs are scheduled to hit stores next month and are scheduled for sale through January.

Camel reproduction posters, a table-lighter and ashtray, and life-size floor displays of the sailor and pin-up, were for sale as a mail-in offer. Camel is a popular cigarets brand which was introduced by R.J. Reynolds Tobacco (RJR) in 1913. Camel cigarettes contain a blend of Turkish and American tobacco. Camel cigarettes were blended in a way that made them easier to smoke, in comparison to other much harsher popular cigarettes brands at the time of its debut on the tobacco market. They were also promoted by a careful teaser advertising, which merely stated that “the Camels are coming”. At the beginning, the most famous variety of Camel cigarettes was the simple pack of the regular, unfiltered variety, which is much too harsh for today’s smokers. Camel Filters cigarettes became very popular thanks to famous actor Humphrey Bogart who popularized Camel brand in the “Casablanca” film. It also became well-know through news broadcaster Edward Murrow, who smoked up to four packs of Camel regulars per day, actually using a Camel cigarette as his trademark. The reverse side of most packs or boxes of Camel cigarets display the following text: “Turkish tobacco is the world’s smoothest, most aromatic leaf. Blending it with more robust domestic tobaccos is the secret to Camel’s distinctive flavor and world-class smoothness.” Or alternatively can be seen displaying the following text (later removed from some packets with the introduction of warning messages): “Camel, a premium blend of the finest quality tobaccos, provides genuine smoking pleasure“. In 2005, Camel made new changes to the Turkish flavors by inserting the Camel title on the rolling paper and also changing the filter color and design. Also, this year the blend called “Turkish Silver”, a light version of either the Turkish Gold or Royal varieties became available. Even when smoked, the text on the paper is often still visible on the ashes. The dromedary (Arabian Camel) it is used as the brand’s logo.

CAMEL HISTORY PACKS (1993)
Camel reproduction posters, a table-lighter and ashtray, and life-size floor displays of the sailor and pin-up, were for sale as a mail-in offer.

PERFECT COMPANIONSHIP…CAMELS (1929—1930)
Camel Filters was the first of the modern ‘American Blend’ cigarettes when introduced in 1913. The revolutionary new taste made Camel an immediate best seller, despite an initial magazine advertising campaign that was rather ho-hum in appearance. These early magazine ads used little graphics, but featured text touting the new brand’s tobacco blend. Posters and roadside billboards however, did feature colorful graphics picturing desert landscapes, or successful looking businessmen. It wasn’t until 1925 that women began to appear in Camel advertising.

Cheap Camel CigarettesCamel cigarettes is a popular cigarette brand which was introduced by R.J. Reynolds Tobacco (RJR) in 1913. Camel cigarettes contain a blend of Turkish and American tobacco. Camel cigarettes were blended in a way that made them easier to smoke, in comparison to other much harsher popular cigarettes brands at the time of its debut on the tobacco market. They were also promoted by a careful teaser advertising, which merely stated that “the Camels are coming”. At the beginning, the most famous variety of Camel cigarettes was the simple pack of the regular, unfiltered variety, which is much too harsh for today’s smokers. Camel regular cigarettes became very popular thanks to famous actor Humphrey Bogart who popularized Camel brand in the “Casablanca” film. It also became well-know through news broadcaster Edward Murrow, who smoked up to four packs of Camel regulars per day, actually using a Camel cigarette as his trademark. The reverse side of most packs or boxes of Camel cigarettes display the following text: “Turkish tobacco is the world’s smoothest, most aromatic leaf. Blending it with more robust domestic tobaccos is the secret to Camel’s distinctive flavor and world-class smoothness.” Or alternatively can be seen displaying the following text (later removed from some packets with the introduction of warning messages): “Camel, a premium blend of the finest quality tobaccos, provides genuine smoking pleasure“. In 2005, Camel made new changes to the Turkish flavors by inserting the Camel title on the rolling paper and also changing the filter color and design. Also, this year the blend called “Turkish Silver”, a light version of either the Turkish Gold or Royal varieties became available. Even when smoked, the text on the paper is often still visible on the ashes. The dromedary (Arabian Camel) it is used as the brand’s logo.

The famous blend of Turkish and United States tobacco – ladies and gentlemen, let us introduce Camel. This R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company cigarettes brand hit the market in 1913 and quickly became very popular. Camel actually was one of the few brands to survive the World War Two and by the end of it has only strengthened its market position. The appearance of the Camel brand was supported by a very innovative (consider the historical period) advertising campaign. These new cigarettes were promoted with the help of special “teasers” who announced that “the Camels were coming”. A circus camel named “Old Joe” was another promotional element. The animal was lead through various American towns and served as a point of free cigarettes distribution. “Old Joe” was later used as the prototype to design the camel on the cigarettes package. For many years the brand’s advertising campaigns were supported by the “I’d walk a mile for a Camel!” slogan. The soft pack of the regular unfiltered cigarettes was the most famous variety of the brand product line. A starring news broadcaster, Edward R. Murrow smoked as many as four packs of Camel regulars every day, adding heavily to the brand’s popularity. Many celebrities of that time were also involved into this “subliminal” advertising campaign. It turned out to be very successful as the Camel regulars’ sales have really hit the sky limits. Joe Camel is a famous mascot of the Camel brand and was introduced in 1987. The American Medical Association tried to make RJR stop the Joe Camel advertising campaign which the company refused. However, after the repeating appeals in 1993 and 1994 and the community shocking reports of children being greatly aware of this cigarette brand mascot, RJR terminated the Joe Camel campaign in 1997. Instead, a more adult oriented campaign was launched to appeal to the desires and dreams of young and successful people.

Camel Cigarettes
Camel with his aggressive advertising to sell cigarettes.To determine changes in the design of Camel cigarettes in the period surrounding the “Smooth Character” advertising campaign and to assess the impact of these changes on youth smoking. Internal documents made available through the document website maintained by RJ Reynolds, manufacturer of Camel cigarettes. Product design research led to the introduction of redesigned Camel cigarettes targeted to younger adult males coinciding with the “Smooth Character” campaign. Further refinements in Camel cigarettes during the following five year period continued to emphasis the smoothness of the cigarette, utilizing additives and blends which reduced throat irritation but increased or retained nicotine impact. Industry competition for market share among younger adult smokers may have contributed to the reversal of a decline in youth smoking rates during the late 1980s through development of products which were more appealing to youth smokers and which aided in initiation by reducing harshness and irritation. Smoke Camel cigarettes.

Collection of Past and Present Cigarettes Ads

Here we have a pair of specially commissioned Camel packs. They belong to a set of seven, four of which are illustrated in this section (can readers help the author to obtain copies of the other three?). From top to bottom (no pun intended) one can note that the ‘hidden’ sexual theme associated with Camel cigarettes is still apparent. The two packs illustrated above appear to be simple variations on the standard Camel pack. This has been reputed to contain a manikin with an erection and various other images. For the manikin, see the Camel’s foreleg. This assertion has been discounted a number of times by R.J.Reynolds and others associated with the company. However, it is rather strange that this figure can still be discerned after many years of pack alterations. If it was not intended to be there, and some people find it offensive, then it need not be there. In fact if one views the book Camel cigarette collectibles by Douglas Congdon-Martin, the figure that isn’t supposed to exist has become slightly more obvious over the years, rather than less so. On the right is the Camel Filters cigarettes (as sold in Mexico, 2000). Note that the coloring is markedly different from the illustration on the left (and other versions of the cigarette pack). Yet all show, to some degree or other the manikin and his ‘penis’. The pack, in fact, highlights the appendage against a lighter background. Additionally, the author has an ad produced around the same time Camel cigarettes first appeared. This also would seem to contain embedded elements. The brand is not Camel but the use of the same type of embedding technique early this century would indicate general knowledge within ad companies producing ads for the tobacco industry at this time. Additionally one might note that the American artist Winslow Homer was rather renowned for embedding images in his work (see Winston Homer, the Obtuse Bard). His work may have been the inspiration for some interesting ads during this early period of cigarette advertising.

The third pack shows the Camel logo made up from rather fluffy clouds. Embedded in the clouds are the letters S E X.

The fourth pack is the most interesting from the point of view of embedded sexual imagery in ads and most evidently reveals a sexual theme. Whatever the origin of the embedded manikin in the 1920′s, this ads embedded imagery indicates that the sexua …..

Camel Billiard
Camel is a brand of cigarettes introduced by U.S. company R.J. Reynolds Tobacco (RJR) in 1913. Camels contain a blend of Turkish and United States tobacco. Camel cigarettes were blended to be considerably easier to smoke in contrast to the much harsher brands popular at the time of its introduction. In addition, they were promoted, prior to official release, by a careful advertising campaign that included “teasers” which merely stated that “the Camels are coming.” This marketing style was, in fact, a prototype for attempts to sway public opinion that coincided with the United States’ entry into the First World War. Another promotion strategy was the use of a Circus camel, ‘Old Joe’, which was driven through town and used to distribute free cigarettes. Old Joe was used as the model for the camel on the package. The brand’s catch-phrase slogan, used for decades, was, “I’d walk a mile for a Camel!” The most famous variety of Camel cigarettes was the soft pack of the regular, unfiltered variety. Camel regulars achieved the zenith of their popularity through personalities such as news broadcaster Edward R. Murrow, who smoked up to four packs of Camel regulars per day, in effect using a Camel cigarette as his trademark. In late 1987, RJR created Joe Camel as the mascot for the brand. In 1991, the American Medical Association published a report stating that 5- and 6-years old could more easily recognize Joe Camel than Mickey Mouse, Fred Flintstone, Bugs Bunny or even Barbie. This led the association to ask RJR to pull the Joe Camel campaign. RJR declined, but further appeals followed in 1993 and 1994. On July 10, 1997, the Joe Camel campaign was retired and replaced with a somewhat more adult campaign which appealed to the desires of twenty-somethings to meet or as the case may be, actually be beautiful and exotic women (desires they nonetheless share with teenagers) in 1930s attire and themes. In 2005, Camel instigated new changes to the Turkish flavors by adding the name on the cigarette paper and changing the filter color and design. A blend called “Turkish Silver”, a light version of either the Turkish Gold or Royal varieties, also became available that year. When smoked, the text on the paper is often still visible on the ashes. Winston-Salem, North Carolina, the city where R.J.R. was founded, was nicknamed “Camel City” at one time because of the brand’s popularity. However, this name is passing out of usage among locals.

Camel sexy
The camel in the logo is of the dromedary variety. In other languages than English, a distinction is made between camels and dromedaries, so the name and image don’t coincide. The name was chosen because in the early 20th century travels to far away places were in vogue and a camel symbolised that nicely. The package artwork was used by rock band Camel for their second album Mirage (including the package sides to make for a square image). The Camel pack is featured prominently in Tom Robbins novel Still Life with Woodpecker, billed as “a love story that happens inside a pack of cigarettes.”

Camel singer
A powerfully thematic ad that stands out in my mind is when Joe Cool Camel is placed on a Harley Davidson motorcycle. Joe is dressed head to toe in biker gear wearing a traditional motorcycle jacket, T-shirt, jeans and black sunglasses. While posing in this tough guy gear, Joe is sitting on the bike smoking a slick cigarette for pure rebellious enjoyment, symbolizing the epitome of a bad boy image. This ad is strategically enduring to teens in that again, they look up to icons that look tough, self-confident, and rebellious because they want to be what that image represents. Camel Cigarettes target this insecurity of teens and in the process they reel them in to smoke cigarettes. Rock and Roll music is most popular among the teenage group. They admire bands for their rough image, style and music. R.J. Reynolds focuses on this phenomenon by creating an ad where Joe Camel features as a rock star. He is place on stage in the spotlight, smoking a cigarette while playing the guitar. The fans are faded in the background, cheering this stud-camel on for his great music. This ad is appealing to the teenage audience because it displays Joe Camel as an icon, a role model that fans adore from their assigned seats at a concert hall. When teens observe this ad, perhaps they will think if the image of Joe Camel looks cool smoking on stage, than they will look cool if they do it too.


R.J. Reynolds plans to turn Camel cigarette packs into homage to Williamsburg

Joe Camel is trying to court the Joe Cools of Williamsburg with an ad campaign aimed at hipsters.

For the month of January, tobacco giant R.J. Reynolds plans to turn its Camel cigarette packs into an homage to the increasingly trendy neighborhood.

The packs will bear the neighborhood’s name along with pictures of the Williamsburg Bridge, the area’s iconic lofts and silhouettes of musicians.

The neighborhood is one of 10 around the country represented in a campaign celebrating the lifestyle of Camel smokers.

“We believe that [Williamsburg] represents a lot of the belief of the Camel brand,” R.J. Reynolds spokesman David Howard said.

“It helps illustrate the break-free attitude that Camel is about, breaking free to be your own person.”

City officials disagree.

“It’s cynical for a tobacco company to launch a branding scheme that tries to exploit the life and energy of our streets to market an addictive product that kills roughly a third of its users,” Health Commissioner Dr. Thomas Farley said.

Hipsters along Williamsburg’s main drag, Bedford Ave., were also skeptical of the sales pitch.

“That’s typical of the cigarette industry. They can’t market to kids anymore, so they have to bump up the age group,” Bryan Murphy, 28, said.

Jonathon Coward, 30, said he’d pick up a pack as a gag: “I’d probably buy them once to show people how stupid it is,” he said.
BY Andrew O’Reilly, Samuel Goldsmith and James Fanelli
DAILY NEWS